Armenian PM Nikol Pashinyan

Margins narrowed, gist augmented: Baku’s red lines and Yerevan’s hopes

After the 2020 ceasefire deal, Baku has successfully managed to take the subject of the Karabakh Armenians off the negotiation table. Originally, the mandate to address the issue was vested with the OSCE Minsk Group, which is no longer capable of activity, and is currently being dismantled or rather disintegrated. The trilateral formats mediated by Moscow and Brussels are mostly focused on the Azerbaijani-Armenian interstate peace agenda, at least, for now.
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Armenian ex-FM's legal-diplomatic objection to peace treaty overruled

Acrimonious pleas permeating the domain in which the Armenian opposition reign supreme are full of tempestuous notes. The fecundity of the reasoning prowess of those vehemently resisting the incumbent government’s progressive Karabakh agenda is being trammelled by one simple urge, where all conceivable measures are being taken to ensure the impossibility of a peace treaty with Azerbaijan.
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Readjusted Armenian reasoning: Status recalibrated. What is new?

After the 2020 November ceasefire that ended the Second Karabakh War, Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan stated that: “this is not a victory, but there is no defeat until you consider yourself defeated”. Back then it looked like an attempt to put on a brave face at a time of national disaster and a cheap remark to placate his disillusioned nation.
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Pashinyan stuns Armenian parliament: Liminal line crossed

Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan’s recently-acquired taste for honesty, that first manifested itself in the December 26 press conference, has again been thrust upon the political elites in Yerevan and the public with an effect that, not to put too fine a point on it, was not too far away from that of a thunderclap.
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