Analysis

Watering the Middle East

The United Nations World Water Development Report confirms what many already know: hundreds of thousands of people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) – especially in Algeria, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen – have faced the worst water shortages in decades in 2016.
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The Perils of Planned Extinctions

A cynical move is underway to promote a new, powerful, and troubling technology known as “gene drives” for use in conservation. This is not just your everyday genetic modification, known as “GMO”; it is a radical new technology, which creates “mutagenic chain reactions” that can reshape living systems in unimaginable ways.
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Killing non-communicable diseases

Over the last 25 years, thanks partly to a coordinated global effort to fight infectious diseases, including malaria, tuberculosis (TB), HIV/AIDS, and polio, childhood mortality rates have been reduced by 50%, and average life expectancy has increased by more than six years. Moreover, the share of the world’s population living in extreme poverty has been halved. These are major achievements, but they have brought a new set of challenges that must urgently be addressed.
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Taking Trump seriously about NATO

A Donald Trump presidency would be a catastrophe for NATO and the West. Aside from threatening to withdraw the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement and to start a trade war with China, Trump praises Russian President Vladimir Putin and suggests that America should not honor its commitment to defend its NATO allies unless they pay more for that protection.
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The economic trend is our friend

These are days of grave disillusionment with the state of the world. Sinister forces of fanatical, faith-based killing – something that we in the West, at least, thought had largely ended by 1750 – are back. And they have been joined by and are reinforcing forces of nationalism, bigotry, and racism that we thought had been largely left in the ruins of Berlin in 1945.
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Intercultural experience sparks entrepreneurialism

What has long been an integral part of the WU Executive Academy's MBA programs has now been scientifically proven by Prof. Nikolaus Franke, the head of WU Vienna's Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation: He recently carried out a research project examining the effects of moving from one cultural setting to another. The results speak for themselves: Intercultural experience significantly improves people's ability to spot entrepreneurial opportunities.
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Trump’s Train Wreck

Donald Trump, the US Republican Party’s presidential nominee, has again shaken up his campaign organization. In doing so, he is revealing more about himself and his so-called management style than he may want people to see. Few presidential campaigns have featured such evident chaos and churn in personnel.
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Enhancing control on Syrian border Turkey’s priority

Turkey's military operations in Syria against the “Islamic State” (IS, ISIL, ISIS or Daesh) terrorist group and the YPG (Kurdish People's Protection Units), as well as the Democratic Union Party (PYD, the Kurdish political party) resulted in activation of members of these organizations, as well as the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) militants in the country.
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Europe’s Last Chance

Most of Europe’s history has been marked by conflict. The American historian Robert Kagan wrote in 2003 that “Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus”; but Europe was for centuries home to the Roman god of war, not the goddess of love.
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Theresa May and the Three Brexiteers

“Brexit means Brexit,” Britain’s new prime minister, Theresa May, has declared. So it must: the wishes of the electorate, expressed by however narrow a margin, must be respected, even though referendums have no place in Britain’s unwritten constitution, which is based, sensibly, on representative parliamentary democracy.
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The Education Roadmap to 2030

When I visited the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan earlier this year, I met with children who told me what education means to them. For Syrian youths who have been forced from their homes and have lost everything, education is about more than qualifications or test scores; it embodies their hope for the future.
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Vaccines for an Aging Population

The world’s population is getting bigger – and older. With the elderly increasingly close to outnumbering their younger counterparts – by 2050, there will be nearly three times more people aged 65 and above than people under four years old – many fear that the burden on government budgets, health-care systems, and economies will become untenable.
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